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 Andy Briggs' 1955 'Slough built' 2CV 
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Joined: March 14th, 2009, 6:47 pm
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Post Andy Briggs' 1955 'Slough built' 2CV
Andy Briggs 1955 'Slough built' 2CV

Andy briggs is a long-time Citroen and 2CV enthusiast from kent in England. He has a small but varied and very interesting collection of Citroens, including an Ami6 (which was built on the day he was born!), an Ami8, a Dyane, several 2cvs, a H van pick-up and a fantastic 1950's H van camper, which is still in original condition.

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Possibly the most special car he owns is the one featured here, a 1955 2cv built at the factory in Slough, England. Andy bought the car from a local 2cv enthusiast Ian Chesright. The car's had quite a history, originally being built for the South African market, hence the PO specification bumpers and the oil bath air filter housing. The original owner was a dentist in South Africa, who used the car daily, until he was killed in a hang-gliding accident(!) The car has since been repatriated to Britain, and has had some sympathetic restoration work done. Thankfully, this hasn't spoilt the look of the car, and as you can see in the pictures, it isn't too shiny and over-restored like some can be.

Apart from the rarity of 2CVs built in Slough in the 50's, there are a few other differences which make the cars special compared to a more common french built ripple-bonnet car. The most obvious is the bootlid, which is a steel panel and not the fabric 'long roof' type, this bootlid is unique to Slough 2cvs.

A more subtle difference is the headlamps. They are actually made by a firm called 'Butlers', who usually made lights for tractors and farm machinery. Not only are the actual lamps different, but the bar they are mounted on is longer, this was to meet UK traffic laws of the time. Alongside the wider headlamp bars, Slough built 2cvs are fitted with trafficators, soleonoid operated turn signals fitted to the A-panels just in front of the doors. These are an early incarnation of the now commonplace indicator lights.

A lot of the electrical equipment is made my Lucas, a British firm of the era, the rear lights and other electrical parts are all branded Lucas, the coil on Andys car however is a rare period accsessory piece made in France.

The rear windows are another unique Slough feature, as they open in the same way that a normal 2cv front window does.

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Inside, apart from the slightly odd sensation that you are sitting in an old 2cv, but the steering wheel isn't in the 'correct' place, there are a few other differences. The seats are a lovely vinyl material, and the starter cord and choke lever are mounted in a little pod on the dashboard along with the ashtray and Turn signal switch, the Speedometer, which is mounted centrally instead of in the usual place on the inside of the A-pillar, is lit by a lovely interior lamp which shines a pencil beam of light into the dial, but when turned illuminates the interior.

On the bonnet, a mascot proclaiming 'Citroen Front-Drive' is mounted, depicting a very Art-Deco style 40's Citroen.

The rear bumper is a Chrome pressed steel affair which is uniquite to Slough 2cvs, however because this car was built for export, the front features a PO specification bumper, with a curious spring mounted number plate. The indicators fitted on this car are a modern addition as in todays traffic most drivers are not aware of the trafficators purpose, and are more used to seeing a flashing orange light.

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It sits on old 400 wheels which aren't quite right, as Slough 2cv usually had a slightly different style with a unique hub cap covering the centre, Andy only has one of the correct style wheels but a full set of the hubcaps for when the right wheels become available.

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Driving the car, the first thing you become aware of is the Trafficlutch, which is such a fabulous invention I cannot understand why it isn't more commonplace. This car has the 12hp version of the 425cc engine, which starts perfectly at the first pull of the cord. When turning tight corners, you can feel the driveshafts, which are the old UJ type, clunking. In the original handbook it does suggest the driver dip the clutch pedal when turning tight corners to prevent damage! The car is suspended on enclosed springs and has batteurs to damp it. The ride is predictably 'old 2cv' with very supple and soft feel but wonderfully smooth thanks to the inertia dampers. When turning the engine off it's nice to give it a little rev and listen to the centrifugal clutch spin round for some time afterwards like a turbine spooling down

I'd like to thank Andy for his time in letting us not only photograph his car but for letting me drive it too.

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Thankyou, The International2cvfriends.com team


June 30th, 2009, 12:36 am
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